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Saving the Reefs in Key Largo. A Divemaster’s Perspective.

Divemaster Natalie at Sea Dwellers Dive Center

Divemaster Natalie

In the end we will only conserve what we love…”

-Baba Dioum

I graduated from Denison University in Ohio with a degree in biology and environmental studies. Before attending graduate school for marine conservation, I wanted to take some time off and gain experience, so I moved down to the sunny Florida Keys to be by the ocean and focus on the marine environment.  Not to mention….to go scuba diving!  I had always heard that Florida Keys diving is the best in the states,  and in particular, in Key Largo, known as the “Dive Capital of America”.   Since moving down here, I have had the opportunity to witness Florida’s environment changing; from working/diving with Sea Dwellers Dive Center, to volunteering in the Everglades, this is truly a unique destination with a huge amount of biodiversity.

With the recent release of Chasing Coral on Netflix, coral reefs have never been such a hot button topic. Watching the coral bleaching events they recorded on the Great Barrier Reef and the rapid degradation of fish life in that ecosystem is heartbreaking. This documentary is informative as it shows the viewer the rapid changes that reefs are undergoing, but it focuses in only one area of the world. So what about the reefs of the Florida Keys?

In recent history, coral reefs have been faced with large scale bleaching due to warmer water temperatures and ocean acidification. In Chasing Coral you are shown a rapid bleaching event, but it doesn’t always happen that quickly. In the Keys, we have faced a few bleaching events and the reefs are not thriving as they once were even five years ago. The reefs are still abundant with marine life and are gorgeous to dive, but there are a lot more white corals and algae covered corals appearing on our reefs.  The reefs are changing.

The vast majority of scientists agree, the decline of coral reefs globally is unarguably driven by humans. The rapid rate at which these events are occurring make it hard forKey Largo diving on the reef some corals to evolve to these changes and this is one of the main reason we are seeing these massive coral die outs. Scientists have already identified the issues and have proposed solutions to these problems years ago, however, getting widespread change has only started to become more pressing as the world is realizing what climate change is affecting.

Widespread change will not begin to happen until individuals start to make changes in their daily lives.


Things you can do to help reduce your footprint and stave off climate change to help our Reefs in Key Largo survive;

  1. Buy a reusable water bottle! Plastics are one of the main marine pollutants and are responsible for killing many marine organisms every year.
  2. Use reusable grocery bags. Going along with the plastic theme, less is best! Plus, most grocery stores will take a small amount of money off your bill for bringing your own bags.
  3. Car pool, ride bikes, use public transportation. The emissions from cars are one of the greenhouses gases responsible for climate change.
  4. Eat less meat. You don’t need to cut it out of your diet completely, but factory farms are one of the main sources that greenhouse gases are emitted from, and billions of gallons of water are used to keep a farm running. One hamburger is the equivalent of someone taking 32 showers, so the less meat you consume, less water will be used and the stress on the environment will be lessened.
  5. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. But mostly reduce. Many people have begun to recycle both at home and at work, which is wonderful! But out of the three r’s, the least you can do is recycle. The best thing to do is reduce your consumption of goods. Less plastics purchased means less plastics that need to be produced!
  6. Be a responsible boater. This means making sure you don’t anchor on a reef or ground your boat on a reef.
  7. Be a responsible fisherman. With the return of mini season upon us for lobsters, it is important to remember that while it is exciting to find and catch lobster, be mindful of what you’re touching and standing on when you’re looking. Touching coral can hurt or kill it, and breaking pieces off because you were trying to catch a lobster isn’t benefitting anything. Additionally, that means not fishing in sanctuaries, out of season, bringing in undersize fish/lobster, and adhering to the guidelines for your local area.
  8. Dive with a Blue Star Operator. Boats and dive shops that are blue star operators have made a commitment to protect and educate about coral reef conservation. Sea Dwellers is a Blue Star Operator 
  9. Be a responsible diver. This means not touching the reef, not standing on the reef, and keeping all your gauges and consoles from dangling below you. As a diver you are mainly down there as an observer, which means not touching or chasing the wildlife.
  10. Don’t fly first class. Flying emits a lot of greenhouse gases into the environment and contributes to about 5% of warming annually. This number will continue to increase every year as air travel becomes more popular. So, don’t fly first class. The larger seats and extra room means that there are less people that can be on one flight, so each individual on that flight has a larger carbon footprint in turn.
  11. Contribute to the CRF – The Coral Restoration Foundation is doing amazing things cultivating, growing, and transplanting corals onto existing reefs and also new areas that are deemed able to start a new reef.  Direct action at it’s best!

Another great piece of news is that with the growth and popularity of scuba diving in the last 15 years, more people are Abundant marine life on these Key Largo dive sites!seeing firsthand the effects of climate change. This means that more people will care about these bleaching events and die offs and more people will want to do their part to help prevent more bleaching events. As Baba Dioum said, “In the end we will conserve only what we love…” and I believe that to be true, so if you aren’t a scuba diver, there is another reason to become certified. As a diver, you will want to protect your favorite dive spots and return year after year and if anything changes hopefully see new growth. For more information, see this link to the NRDC website. 

Together we can make a difference, the marine life you see on your next dive will appreciate it!

 

Divemaster NatalieSea Dwellers Dive Center of Key Largo

Jacques Cousteau | The “Father of Scuba Diving”

I remember clearly to this day watching on our television as an Octopus slithered towards the round glass jar sitting on the reef bottom with a large lobsterJacques Cousteau Underwater World inside of it.   A big cork was covering the opening of the glass jar, and was the only thing keeping the octopus from devouring the lobster.  Slowly the octopus inspected the jar with it’s arms, (octopus do not have “tenacles” they have arms), covering all surfaces of the jar repeatedly.  Eventually, this amazingly intelligent creature zeroed in on the cork and r Recognizing that it was the key to his meal, he popped it open and that was it for the poor hapless lobster!

“The Undersea World of Jacques Cousteau”

This was the show, a series back in the 70’s and I was a huge fan.  I did not miss an episode, and it was one of the main reasons I knew I wanted to be a scuba diver from a very early age. Growing up in South Florida the underwater environment was always front and center, and I was a huge fan of Jacques Cousteau like many others of my generation. The series was about the intrepid undersea explorer circling the globe on his floating scientific laboratory, the Calypso.  What adventures he had! A pioneer in marine study, the red-capped Frenchman introduced generations of people to the mysteries of the seas.

Scaub diving with jacques CousteauMany younger scuba divers today are not aware, but in 1942, Cousteau invented an underwater demand valve system that could supply divers with air when they breathed. This demand regulator was called “Aqua-Lung”, (same as the scuba equipment manufacturer today), and it eventually opened the door to scuba diving for everyone.

The Birth of Recreational Diving

“The impact of the Aqua-Lung cannot be overstated. It was the first efficient and safe scuba set that allowed divers to stay underwater for long periods of time at deep depths. It was a small contraption with a simple design that was reliable and relatively inexpensive. This monumental advance in diving technology laid the foundation for the creation and growth of the recreational scuba diving market. Up until that point, diving equipment, though widely used for military and commercial purposes, was not available to the general public for recreational or sport purposes. The very idea of diving for fun, or to explore, was virtually unheard of.”  See source link

A Setback for Calypso

Some time ago, the Cousteau Society set out to bring back the Iconic Calypso, starting with renovating the ship. Now it seems that although the renovations were pushing ahead, there has been a setback. On September 12 at around 2:30 am, a fire broke out and damaged the legendary ship.  I’ll hope that one day the Calypso can ply the waters again in honor of Cousteau and everything he accomplished.

As I sit here in Key Largo, Florida Keys, sometimes referred to as the “Dive Capital of the World”, how can I not but look back admiringly at the undisputed “Father of Scuba Diving” Jacques Cousteau?  As someone who has been fortunate enough to make a living doing something he loves, scuba diving, I can only look back at this giant admiringly, and offer him my silent gratitude.  A gratitude that began when I was but a child.

-Rob Haff

 

Sea Dwellers Dive Center and Key Largo Diving Packages!

Sea Dwellers Dive & Stay Package – One of Key Largo’s Best Attractions!

Key Largo Diving Packages

For 25 years now, Sea Dwellers has been teamed up with the Holiday Inn Key Largo Resort in offering one of the most popular Key Largo diving packages in Key Largo.  Why has this been so successful?  A couple simple reasons really.

Dive & Stay Packages in the Florida KeysDive Package ConvenienceSea dwellers Dive Center of Key Largo

Your Boats are just Steps from your room!

One thing we hear from our divers is they love the convenience of our diving packages.  Our boats are just steps from your room at the Holiday Inn Key Largo Resort.  Scuba divers can wake up, go eat a full buffet breakfast at the Resort, and then stroll on out to their dive boat…couldn’t be and easier!  After a couple of great dives on our reefs and wrecks you are brought right back to your dock and a minute or two later you are back in your room.  Your Dive Center is also just across the highway for easy access.

Florida Keys Dive Package Amenities

The Holiday inn Key Largo Resort has many amenities to enhance your diving package.  2Your Dive Center scuba staff pools, outside Tiki Bar, full service restaurant “Bogie’s Cafe” and one of Key Largo’s newest restaurants, “Skipper’s Dockside”…a wonderful tropical diving experience harking back to the Florida Key’s early days! This is one of the best Key Largo diving packages on the island!

Great Scuba Diving Close By!

Our boats are fast, custom built dive boats that will wisk you to your morning or afternoon dive sites quickly and comfortably.  Most of your Dive sites are within 30 minutes from the Marina!

Dive Life

Sea Dwellers Dive Center of Key Largo has been in business in the Florida Keys since 1974. We know how to treat our divers, we know what they want.  There are other options for you here, and we know that how we treat you makes the difference and accordingly out experienced staff provides you a safe, comfortable, no-rush environment for scuba diving in Key Largo.

“We’ve Never Forgotten that Diving is Fun”

Key Largo Diving – Marine Sanctuary

And lastly, we offer great scuba diving in Key Largo!  Our reefs offer some of the most Great scuba diving in key largoabundant and diverse marine life in the Caribbean, (according to the REEF Foundation, as well as our customers).  The Florida Keys is known for it’s schooling fishes, as well as other marine life not seen in other places in the Caribbean. The Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary provides protections for our marine life and our scuba divers benefit greatly!

Key Largo Diving Packages – Great Pricing

Sea Dwellers Dive Center & the Holiday Inn Key Largo Resort have been offering Dive & Stay Packages together for over 25 years. We offer great pricing discounts for any length of stay any time of year!  Beautiful Hotel Resort, fast Dive Boats, friendly staff, and great diving are all here for you at a great package price.  Call toll-free 1-800-451-3640 any time 7 days a week for your Key Largo Diving Package quote, we’re sure to have what you are looking for down here in beautiful Key Largo!

-Your Sea Dwellers Staff

 

 

The Unique Florida Keys

One of a Kind – Sun, Fun, food and Scuba Diving the “One of a Kind” Florida Keys!

While “surfing” the web for Florida Keys info and news, I came across a very nice article from “The Daily Meal” website titled “12 Ways the Florida Keys Are Unlike Anywhere Else on Earth”.  Its a cool article, and a cool website for foodies by the way, please check it out when you can.

The unique Florida Keys...and Key Largo

Photo by Jim Matyszyk

It got me thinking about our islands down here, the Florida Keys, and how unique they really are to the North American Continent.  The Florida Keys is the only area on the North American continent that exhibits traits of a “Tropical” environment by definition, (although technically just north of the official tropical zone boundary). The rest of South Florida and parts of Texas and Mexico have sub-tropical conditions.

“America’s Caribbean” Family scuba diving in key largo

The Florida Keys have been referred to as America’s Caribbean” for a myriad of reasons, starting with the “tropical” environment listed above.  But they are also home to the only living coral barrier reef in North America.  Obviously as many know, this makes it the go-to spot for scuba diving for most Americans.  No passport required!

“Tropical Island”

When you are in the Keys, doesn’t it just feel like you are in the “tropics”?  Meaning everything that we simply think of when talking “tropics”!  Lots of sunshine, (the most sunny days in North America), palm trees, beautiful blue water surrounding you at every turn….seafood shacks, great fishing, great Key Largo scuba diving, Come visit Key Largo and the Florida keys(oh, I already mentioned that didn’t I?).  You get the picture?

“One of a Kind”

The Florida Keys are simply, “one of a kind”.  Probably not a secret to many of you, and why you keep coming down to visit us year after year!  We hope that continues, and we think it will if the last few years are any indication…Key Largo and the Florida Keys have been busier than ever!   Come on down, the sun, seafood, palm tress and great scuba diving are here waiting for you!

Sea Dwellers Dive Center Staff –

 

 

2016 Sea Dwellers’ Reunion Weekend

A Weekend of Scuba Diving in Key Largo with Great Friends!

What a blast we had again this year at our annual “Sea Dwellers Dive Center Reunion Weekend”!  We were a bit worried, the weather had gotten erratic on us, (after a great year overall), and we had a terrible weekend prior to the event.  But the dive Gods were on our side and the Key Largo weather cleared the day before the first of our 4 days of diving.

Once again, we had a great bunch of folks join us, most of which we’ve known for years…no, decades really!    The great states of California, Colorado, North Carolina, South Carolina, New York, Illinois, Connecticut, Florida, Wisconsin, and New Jersey were represented, (I know I’ve left someone out..sorry!).

The scuba diving was good, seas calm…and much marine life was experienced.  Many of our scuba divers know each other, and have been diving together for years also.  This weekend always brings like-minded people together to do what we all love a lot, scuba diving, in a tropical environment, Key Largo, Florida Keys!  What more can you ask for?

The Sea Dwellers’ Staff enjoys this weekend. It’s a great bunch of people we’ve known for so long that it’s like, well..a family reunion!  Good friends, good camaraderie, good scuba diving, good environment. We feel lucky to have such great people diving with us for so long!

Jim Matyszyk

Jim Matyszyk

Here’s just a few pictures from the weekend that we’ve gotten so far…it was a great weekend of Key largo scuba diving!  We’ll keep adding some more as we get them and thanks to all divers (and non-divers) Dive Key largo with Sea Dwellerswho attended!

 

Jim Mat

Jim Matyszyk

 

scuba diving fans!

florida keys number one in areareunion9

all of us diving today!

reunion7Scuba diving Reunion Weekend Florida Keysa song in the florida keys
Good scuba diving!Dive sunset

Great diving in key largo

Jim Matyszyk

Key largo reinion dive weekendGood friends in Key largo

Key Largo Roundup – A Fantastic Summer of Scuba Diving – Reef Conservation

The Florida Keys are happening…and some great news for the reefs…

We’re happy to report that the summer of 2017 has been a great one for scuba diving.  We’ve seen an up tick of business for the last 2 years now, we’re happy to report, and one of the reasons is…great scuba diving!  Our Captains cannot remember so many calm, clear days as we’ve been blessed with for these last couple years.  Good news for divers for sure.  And while we’ve all heard about the fragile reefs being endangered by rising water temps, a few big players in the Marine Conservation world have announced some big news to help counter this…(see below).

Key Largo Marine Life

Divers love reef sharks!I know I know, we’ve said this before…but heck, we’re going to say it again…the darn marine life down here in Key Largo is simply fantastic!  Caribbean Reef Sharks (on most dives now), Spotted Eagle Rays, Tarpon, squid, Goliath Groupers, just to name some of the critters we’ve been seeing on our reefs and wrecks. Add this to the calm seas and you’ve got great scuba diving.  We’re fortunate to have many of our scuba divers give us pics of some of the marine life off Key Largo they’ve been seeing.squid2

 

New Coral Restoration Project in the Florida Keys

Coral Restoration Project

Mote Lab – Nature Conservacy Coral Restoration Project

We’re happy to announce that the Mote Marine Laboratory and The Nature Conservancy are “partnering on a coral conservation initiative that will enable coral restoration at unprecedented scales throughout the Caribbean and the Florida Keys”.

You’ve heard about the Coral Restoration Foundation and the great things they are doing for Florida Keys reefs, and now some other big guys in the Marine Conservation world are joining the action.  It’s encouraging on many fronts!

“A collaborative research effort with the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS), the Nature Conservancy (TNC) and Mote is making great advances in developing culture methods for hard corals at Mote’s Tropical Research Laboratory field station in the Florida Keys.”

All of this good news for Key Largo, the Florida Keys, and of course all you scuba divers out there with an appreciation for our beautiful, yet endangered coral reefs.  Your crew here at Sea Dwellers appreciates everyone who has been scuba diving with us this summer, and we hope to see you down here again real soon!

Rob
Sea Dwellers Dive Center of Key Largo

Key Largo Marine Life

Scuba Diving with lots of fish in Key Largo!DSC00155 (1)

Wow, has the marine life been strong for diving in Key Largo this year!  Just an update, this summer has been amazing for marine Life here…again…we’re happy to report!  So in addition to the abundance of tropicals, schooling fishes, etc, that we always see on our reefs here…we’ve been seeing multiple Reef Sharks daily while scuba diving, a good amount of Spotted Eagle Rays, and Tarpon!  While corals have been struggling here, as well as everywhere in the world due to rising seas temperatures, it’s hopeful that our marine life seems to be doing so well!

Caribbean Reef Sharks

Key Largo Reef Shark

Photo by David Jefferiss

This isn’t a totally new phenomenom in Key Largo, as our scuba divers have been seeing increasing numbers of Caribbean Reef Sharks for several years now. But they are definitely peaking this year. At this point we can say that we’re seeing them on the majority of dives, (more than 50%).    Last week on Molasses Reef, divers reported seeing between 8 – 10 Reef Sharks on one dive alone! According to Wikipedia“Measuring up to 3 m (9.8 ft) long, the Caribbean reef shark is one of the largest apex predators in the reef ecosystem, and they are believed to play a major role in shaping Caribbean reef communities.”

Tarpon

Key Largo diving with Tarpon

Photo by Bruce Ramsey

Last week a school of about 20 large Tarpons went cruising by several of our divers on a dive on Molasses Reef! And several times over the last weeks divers have come across Tarpons, either large single ones, or in pairs. Strength, stamina, and fighting ability, make the tarpon a premier game fish in Key largo as well as the entire sate of Florida.  This is generally the time of year scuba divers see them come in on the reef, and this year their numbers have been up.  They are bright silver with large scales…and can grow to about 4–8 ft long and weigh 60–280 lbs according to Wikipedia.  They do school at times, which can be exciting to watch while scuba diving.

So come on down and go scuba diving in Key Largo, the marine life, always one of the Keys’ biggest attraction, is really doing well!  An while you’re at it if you want to dive with Sea Dwellers Dive Center that’s cool with us too!

Key Largo “Marine Life Series” – The Snapper

sd shop 0118 copy

Photo by Bob Haff

Snappers 

To most divers who know, Key Largo diving means marine life, and lots of it!  In particular, Key Largo and the Florida Keys are known for it’s schooling fishes…and it’s a world class destination in this regard!  When people think of coming to Key Largo to Scuba dive, most regular visitors think about these two related species. Whether its looking at large schools of them on the reef, or enjoying a dinner of yellow tail snapper after a fun day of diving, Key Largo makes it’s living on Snappers!

Snapper get their name from their behavior of snapping their jaws when they are hooked. The Grunt, a member of the Snapper family, makes an unusual “grunt” sound when they grind their teeth together. All Snappers are nocturnal feeders and gather in small to large groups which drift in the shadows and under overhangs during the day.

 

 

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Photo by David Jefferiss

Probably the most frequently seen schooling fish are Blue Stripped Grunts. These were shot on Snapper Ledge, one of our most famous dive sites for schooling fish.

 

 

Photo by Jim Matyszyk

Photo by Jim Matyszyk

On Molasses reef scuba divers frequently see schools of mahogany snapper mixed in with French grunts. Small mouth grunts can be identified by their smaller size as well as their distinctive yellow stripes.

 

A Yellowtail off the coast of Key Largo, Florida Keys.

Photo by Bob Haff

SDweb272[2]The Mutton Snapper is one of the larger members of the Snapper family. The larger Snappers tend to be more solitary, and generally can be a bit skittish around scuba divers.

 

 

 

Most fishermen agree…pound for pound, the Snapper is one of the toughest fish to haul in by by hook & Line…

 

This is a small selection of the members of the Snapper family that you can expect to see when you are scuba diving Key Largo waters with Sea Dwellers Dive Center. Next time you come diving with us, why don’t you try to count the number of different types of Grunts and Snappers you can identify on each dive? It is almost impossible to do a dive off Key Largo without seeing at least two or three species, and I think you will be surprised to see what a large selection you come up with. There are about 10 different species of Snappers commonly seen while diving Key Largo waters.

Thanks to all!
Your Sea Dwellers Staff!

Meet the Scuba Instructors!

Dive Instructor Jeremy

We’re proud to announce this new blog…part of the “Meet the Scuba Instructor” Series, starting with Jeremy Weeks!  Instructor Jeremy has been with Sea Dwellers for almost 9 years now, and has certified quite a few divers at this point!  We’re happy to say that we get a lot of good feedback about Jeremy from our customers, (just check out our TripAdvisor Page)…which is good for everyone.  Scuba diving is not a “natural” thing for many folks starting out, and Jeremy has a knack for making people comfortable in the water so they can enjoy diving. At Sea Dwellers we believe that “diving is fun”, and should not be a high-pressure situation, so we strive to create an easy-going, safe atmosphere for people to learn in.  All of our Instructors have adopted this philosophy, and we pride ourselves on our Instruction. Being a good Dive Instructor starts with enjoying what you do, and as you will see from this interview, Jeremy loves to scuba dive!

A special thanks to our good friend and great scuba diver Tomek for creating this wonderful video! Tomek is part of the JetBlue Team, and we’re extremely proud to consider ourselves the “JetBlue Dive Center”!

You can check out Tomek, Jeremy, Sea Dwellers and some of the JetBlue staff we’ve certified here on the “Scuba Blue” website!

We hope you enjoy Jeremy’s Interview and thanks to all!
Sea Dwellers Dive Center of Key Largo

 

Key Largo “Marine Life Series” – The Sea Turtle

All divers love the Sea Turtle it seems…


“We were diving Key Largo, Molasses Reef, myself and 2 new students when we came upon a young Loggerhead Turtle. I hastened to coax my students along so we could take a look at him before he swam away.  As it turned out, he decided we were interesting enough and spent about 10 minutes swimming with us… a wonderful dance for my students and I!”
Sea Dwellers’ Instructor Rob

How many times we’ve experienced the happy face of a diver after an encounter with a Sea Turtle on a Key Largo dive! These specialScuba diving & photography encounters prove the uncertainty of a Turtle’s behavior; at times skittish, simply swimming away quickly when glancing a diver… and sometimes the opposite; content to simply swim right on up to a scuba diver and “check things out”.   The latter is one of the great joys of scuba diving Key Largo…being able to swim with and interact with one of these beautiful, interesting creatures on a coral reef!

Male sea turtles actually spend their entire lives in the ocean. Adult females do return to beaches on land to lay their eggs, and they often migrate long distances between the areas where they feed and where they nest. There are seven species of marine turtles, five of which are found in the waters of the Florida Keys. These air-breathing reptiles are well adapted to life in the marine world, with streamlined bodies and large flippers.

The Hawksbill

Hawksbill Turtle

Photo by Patrick O’Boyle

A close relative of the Green Turtle, the Hawksbill Turtle is named for their narrow, pointed beak-like nose. One way to tell the difference between the Green and the Hawksbill is the Hawksbill has 2 pairs of plates between the eyes, the Green only one.

hawksbill head

Hawksbill Turtle Closeup

The Hawksbill has a very distinctive pattern of overlapping scales on their shells which can be quite beautiful. Unfortunately, these colored and patterned shells make them highly-valuable and commonly sold as “tortoiseshell” in markets, according to the WWF.

Hawksbills are found mostly throughout the world’s tropical oceans, commonly on coral reefs. They feed mainly on sponges, using their pointed beaks to extract them from corals crevices on reefs. They also eat sea anemones and jellyfish.  This is probably the most common turtle for divers diving Key largo waters.

The Loggerhead

The most abundant of all the marine turtle species in U.S. waters, the Loggerhead is also one of the easiest to identify due to…yes, because of it’s huge head.  Often seen “sleeping” while nestled among the coral, they are also known to be one of the most comfortable when interacting with scuba divers.

But persistent population declines due to pollution, shrimp trawling, and development in their nesting areas, among other factors, have kept this wide-ranging sea creature on the threatened species list since 1978.

The Green Sea Turtle

The Florida Keys were known for it’s large population of Green Turtles decades ago before they were hunted by humans to near extinction worldwide.  A very close relative of the Hawksbill, Greens are considered very good to eat.  I hate to admit it, but I remember as a little boy eating turtle sandwiches with my parents at Manny & Isa’s Restaurant in Islamorada, our favorite spot back then. Of course at the time we had no idea that they were being fished into near-extinction. But I know now, and I wouldn’t eat sea turtle anywhere!

Green Turtle in Key Largo, Florida Keys

Green Turtle in Key Largo, Florida Keys – Photo David Jefferiss

Old Guys

Sea turtles are the living representatives of a group of reptiles that has existed on Earth and travelled our seas for the last 100 million years. They are a fundamental link in marine ecosystems and help maintain the health of coral reefs and sea grass beds. – WWF


The LeatherBack

I remember very well running the Sea Dweller III out to the reef one day many years ago, and coming upon a huge, black object on thelb surface of the water.  Coming up beside it, I realized that it was moving…and it was like nothing I had ever seen before! With huge dark ridges and about 5 – 6 feet long, I realized that it was a Leatherback Turtle. A truly amazing site!

While rare, they are found in Florida Keys waters, (I’ve never had a diver on the boat say they saw one underwater on a dive). The Leatherback is the largest of the turtles and the largest reptile living today. They can grow to be over 6 feet and can weigh upwards of  2,000 pounds. They are the only turtle that lacks a hard, bony shell.

5 Things You Can Do To Save Sea Turtles

We hope to continue to Dive Key Largo waters with Sea Turtles, as they are one of the reasons we dive in the first place! While human activity has helped to endangered them, we can also act to save them! With awareness and an appreciation of the fragility of these magnificent creatures, we can all contribute to their preservation!  Now let’s go scuba diving and find some more turtles…

Thanks to all!
Rob & Your Sea Dwellers Staff

 

Sea Dwellers Dive Center of Key Largo 99850 Overseas Highway Key Largo, FL 33037 1-800-451-3640